Sekyeong Lee


As Interviewed by Angela Kim, March 22, 2011
"Women rights are always necessary. Either a girl or boy, you’re still a human being, so you deserve same rights."
Sekyeong Lee

Introductory Profile: About Sekyeong Lee

Sekyeong Lee is my mother. She liked to tell a lot of funny stories about her past. She told us how the lack of women rights started in the world, and compared and contrasted the before and after the struggle. She spoke in exciting and fun tone, and seemed like she was having fun telling me about her past.

My mother has curly medium brown hair and dark brown eyes. She is not very tall, and has small hands and feet. She smiles a lot, which is evidence that she is generally a happy person. She is a very physically outgoing person. She usually has her hair in a ponytail. She only puts on her make-up lightly, which is evidence that she is happy with her appearance even without her make-up. My mother tried not to be biased, talking about both sides. She is thoughtful and passionate about what she likes. She is bright, likes to make other people laugh, and is a caring and loving person. My mother is social, talking about social injustice and politics with her friends.

She was born in Kwangju, South Korea on August 14, 1970. She was the first child of five kids, four girls and one boy. She grew up in Kwangju until 1990. She majored in English Literature and graduated from Seoul City University. She married my father, Panjin Kim, in December, 1996. She used to teach English in YWCA Kindergarten in South Korea. She had her first child, me, on January 26th, 1998. Seven years later, she had her second child, Michelle, on August 8th, 2005. In July, 2007, her family and she moved to Austin. She is currently a housewife and has been living in Austin for about two and a half years.

During the interview, my mother spoke in fun, exciting tone. I recall my mom liked to tell a lot of funny stories about her past relating to women rights in South Korea. She seemed like she was having fun in my interview. She was also having fun comparing and contrasting the before and after the struggle of the women rights in South Korea. I was grateful to interview her because she was fun and I learned a lot about the struggle of women rights in South Korea.